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How To Know If You've Had A Chemical Pregnancy


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A chemical pregnancy, also known as a biochemical pregnancy, is an early form of miscarriage. It occurs when a fertilized egg fails to implant in the uterus or begins to develop and then stops growing. The effects of a chemical pregnancy typically occur within a few weeks of conception, making it difficult to detect. However, there are certain signs and symptoms that can indicate whether someone has had or is currently having a chemical pregnancy.

The most common sign of a chemical pregnancy is a missed period followed by light spotting or bleeding. This usually happens four to six days after fertilization, but may also occur about one week later if the embryo does not successfully implant in the uterus. Other physical indicators include cramping, breast tenderness, fatigue, and nausea. While these symptom are usually experienced by people who go on to have successful pregnancies, they may be more severe in those with a chemical pregnancy.


It is not possible to diagnose a chemical pregnancy through physical examination or imaging tests. The only way to confirm the presence of a chemical pregnancy is through a blood test, which checks for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels. This hormone is produced shortly after conception and will typically decrease if a chemical pregnancy has occurred. A second hCG test should be done one or two weeks later to ensure that the levels have dropped significantly and to confirm if a miscarriage has taken place.


If you believe you might have had or are currently having a chemical pregnancy, it is important to seek medical advice. While chemical pregnancies are not uncommon, you should always have any type of miscarriage evaluated by a doctor to make sure there are no underlying issues that need to be addressed. Your doctor can provide support and guidance through this difficult time.


In conclusion, a chemical pregnancy is an early form of miscarriage that occurs when a fertilized egg fails to implant in the uterus or begins to develop and then stops growing. It is usually indicated by a missed period followed by light spotting or bleeding and other physical symptoms such as cramping, breast tenderness, fatigue, and nausea. The only way to confirm if someone has had a chemical pregnancy is through a blood test which checks for hCG levels. If you believe you may have had a chemical pregnancy, it is important to seek medical advice.

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References:

1. Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Chemical pregnancy - Symptoms and causes. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chemical-pregnancy/symptoms-causes/syc-20375215

2. American Pregnancy Association (APA). (2020). Chemical Pregnancies: What Are They? Retrieved from http://americanpregnancy.org/getting-pregnant/chemical-pregnancies/.

3. BabyCentre UK (2017). Chemical pregnancy: signs, symptoms and emotions of miscarriage after a positive test result. Retrieved from https://www.babycentre.co.uk/a25005168/chemical-pregnancy-signs-symptoms-and-emotions-of-miscarriage-after-a-positive-test-result

4. National Health Service (NHS). (2018). Chemical pregnancy – what is it? Retrieved from https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/pregnancy/what-is -a--chemical--pregnancy/.

5. Fertility Authority. (2015). What is a chemical pregnancy? Retrieved from https://fertilityauthority.com/everythinginfertility/whatisaachemicalpregnancy/.

6. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). (2016). Chemical Pregnancy. Retrieved from https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Chemical-Pregnancy?IsMobileSet=false.

7. Women’s Health Network (WHN). (2020). What is a Chemical Pregnancy? Retrieved from https://www.womenshealthnetwork.com/pms-and-pregnancy/chemical-pregnancy/.


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